Out with 2012, In with 2013

It’s been 12 years since this millennium started, and I have to tell you I am still left with some very important questions.  First of all, what do we call the last decade, is it the 2000’s?  That just doesn’t sound right, and it would require us to call this decade the 10’s, and I’m not a big fan of that either.  And just what is the year called – is it two thousand and thirteen, or is it twenty thirteen?  Obsessive admittedly, but what keeps you up at night?

Anyway, the year is winding down in my NYC podiatry practice, and it seems a good time to reflect, consider the lessons of the year, offer thanks for what we have, and plan for the New Year.  It’s certainly nice to party, but it’s also nice to channel that energy and use it as a springboard for future growth.  Here goes then.

I had a few resolutions from last year:

  • Attend a celebration of the completion of a cycle of Talmud study in Giants Stadium
  • Complete a cycle of study of the Talmud (almost)
  • Run a marathon (OK, it was 4.30, but I finished)
  • Become a better doctor
  • Expand my NYC podiatry practice
  • Try to be a little to a lot better in areas of family life and other personal areas of growth
  • Catch the Phish New Year’s run at Madison Square Garden

Probably leaving a few out and they are meant to be in whatever order seems logical and proper.  I Managed to check off the list pretty thoroughly, albeit with a few that are long term works in progress.

A lot happened this year, and in NYC especially, we have learned a lot of lessons, and have a lot for which we should be thankful.  Here are a few of my take home lessons:

  • Hug your kids.  A lot.  No kids? Hug someone, anyone.
  • Keep your insurance agent’s number on speed dial, call him or her on a regular basis to ensure your life and stuff are adequately protected.
  • Help a stranger, for no particular reason.
  • The Olympics are cool.
  • Big guns are not cool.  Sorry, don’t mean to get political, but the founding fathers ensured protection against enemies, foreign and domestic.  Doesn’t necessarily include the right to assault rifles.  If bazookas and tanks are not available to the general public, then there is a line somewhere.
  • i-stuff is cool.
  • War is not so cool.
  • The Middle East is a mess.
  • The news is depressing.

Fear not, though, I leave you with a positive note.  The good news is here.

Within my own personal universe, it’s been a good year, with a few bumps.  Thanks to my wife and family for being all that, to my patients for challenging me and giving me the privilege of trying to improve their quality of life, to my office staff for their hard work and service with a smile, and to my director of community relations, Katherine Lee, who hopefully will never realize that she is more than capable of handling a much bigger and better practice and trying to find said practice.

I am fully optimistic and upbeat for 2013, no matter how you pronounce it.  Let’s look forward and hope and pray for a year of growth, happiness, and success all around.

See you in the office.

Dr. Ernest L. Isaacson